The Budget Transparency Act of 2017 will "require the entire state budget to be put online for the public to see line-item by line-item how tax dollars are spent."

Assemblyman Jay Obernolte, vice chair of the Assembly Budget Committee, was one of three state lawmakers Friday who announced legislation to put the sum of the California budget online in a push aimed at transparency.

The Budget Transparency Act of 2017 will "require the entire state budget to be put online for the public to see line-item by line-item how tax dollars are spent."

The proposal, Assembly Bill 6, will be referred to a policy committee for a hearing in coming weeks.

"California is the technology capital of the world and as such we should be a leader in having a state budget that is fully transparent, searchable and interactive," Obernolte, R-Hesperia, said in a statement. "It's critical that our constituents have access to our spending decisions in order to keep the Legislature accountable."

Assemblyman Vince Fong, R-Kern County, and Assemblyman Tom Lackey, R-Palmdale, are the other lawmakers spearheading the charge.

According to information cited by Fong's office, California ranked dead last in budget transparency in a recent report which was based on the primary metric of how easily the public can access the state's spending data.

Meanwhile, the announcement comes a day after state lawmakers passed a record $125 billion budget lauded by Gov. Jerry Brown as "balanced and progressive" and praised by Democratic lawmakers for expanding funding for social services, but universally panned by Republican lawmakers for breaking promises.

Obernolte called it a "fairly responsible budget," yet criticized the spending plan for raiding transportation funds and sending 30 percent of money from the new gas tax to projects unrelated to roads.

"Also, voters who supported Proposition 56 were promised that the increase in tobacco tax would be used to expand low-income Californians' access to health and dental care," he said. "Regrettably, this budget diverts more than half of that money to the General Fund. Californians deserve better."

State Sen. Scott Wilk, R-Antelope Valley, said the budget missed the mark on the state's biggest challenges.

"The largest budget in our state's history breaks faith with addressing the challenges, hopes and aspirations of ordinary Californians," Wilk said in a statement.

He said it slashed funds for career technical education, which he has long championed, and he echoed Obernolte's lament over the gas tax hike funding diversion away from roads.

"This budget was crafted without transparency or accountability, behind closed doors by three people," he continued, "the Governor, the Senate Pro Tem (Democrat Kevin de Leon) and the Speaker of the Assembly (Democrat Anthony Rendon). Adding insult to injury, special interest lobbyists were given the language to the budget before legislators and the public. This budget fails on both process and policy."

Shea Johnson can be reached at 760-955-5368 or SJohnson@VVDailyPress.com. Follow him on Twitter at @DP_Shea.