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Jose Quintero, Desert Dispatch
Members of the Gospel Haven Jr. Choir sang songs honoring Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. at the 17th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Peace Breakfast on Monday morning. The annual breakfast was hosted by the Art and Industrial Women and Men's Club at Sizzler, with the proceeds benefiting the Barstow Scholarship Foundation Inc.

Barstow honors King at annual breakfast

STAFF WRITER

BARSTOW • Approximately 100 community members packed Sizzler for the 17th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Peace Breakfast on Monday morning.

The restaurant was filled with community and church members, as well as city officials before the business opened for regular operation at 10:30 a.m.

Tim Silva, city of Barstow Mayor Pro Tem, was in attendance and presented a proclamation from the city of Barstow, recognizing Monday as Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day., and encouraging Barstownians to observe the day in honor of King’s life.

“The proclamation just recognizes Dr. King’s accomplishments and what he did for the nation in a peaceful manner,” Silva said. “Many cities may not recognize this day, but Barstow does. For most, it’s a reminder of what it used to be like. It’s an encouragement to the community to emulate the way he used peace to promote his message of equality. Dr. King didn’t stand up for just one race, he stood for equality for everybody.”

The program commenced with the Mistress of Ceremonies, Lucille West-Brooks, leading in the Pledge of Allegiance followed by a “Negro Anthem.” The Gospel Haven Jr. Choir proceeded with songs honoring King before the buffet-style breakfast.

Following the breakfast, the program resumed with Barstow High School Principal Derrick Delton as the guest speaker.

The breakfast was hosted by the Art and Industrial Women and Men’s Club, with the proceeds benefiting the Barstow Scholarship Foundation Inc., according to West-Brooks.

On Saturday, approximately 100 locals made their way up Barstow Road for the Peace March, intended to be symbolic of the struggle for civil rights.

Mary L. Hailey, the president of the Art and Industrial Women’s Club, said the march is meant to mirror King’s peace marches and promotes peace between all people.

“Dr. King just happened to be a black man, but what he stood for was everyone,” Hailey said. “It wasn’t about race, creed or color, he wanted everyone to be fair with each other and get fair treatment. These events just show that everyone does come together and treats each other just like Dr. King dreamed about.”

Jose Quintero can be reached at 760-256-4122 or JQuintero@DesertDispatch.com.


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